• Countries (58)
  • Nigeria

    Nigeria boasts the largest economy and population in Africa.

    It has some eHealth service initiatives available. It has a communications act which has no specific eHealth provisions or impact. Nigeria has numerous health professional bodies.

    There is no coherent strategy in place so far; the draft 2012 national ICT policy, intended to transform the state into a knowledge economy, has yet to reach full approval.

    Nigeria uses MEDITECH's EHR. An eHNA post has more.

     Pathfinder International aims to go beyond health system interventions to navigate social determinants of health in communities using it’s mHealth experiences in Nigeria. An eHNA post has more details.

    Nigeria uses several telemedicine services. mHealth includes Dial-A-Doctor and mobile midwife, Heathymagination, Smart Help app, AirSstripONE and Sense4baby. IBM has a Watson initiative in the country. Airtel and UNAIDS have jointly promoted Touching Lives to help to reduce HIV in Nigeria.

    Nigeria uses DHIS2. An eHNA post has more details.

    Learning about Living uses interactive eLearning techniques to provide tailored health messaging for the youth. It was launched in 2007. An eHNA post has more.

    The country has initiatives with IntraHealth, as posted on eHNA.

    • 900 views
  • Republic of the Congo

    Republic of the Congo (not to be confused with the Democratic Republic of Congo, DRC) participates in a number of regional eHealth initiatives. The Republic is a member of Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine (RAFT).

    • 221 views
  • Rwanda

    eHealth in Rwanda is a quickly growing industry with many committed stakeholders, including the Government of Rwanda (GoR), several nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and private sector partners. Particularly in the areas of EPRs and a national reporting system, Rwanda is a pioneer in national initiatives to integrate ICT into its expanding healthcare system. In 2015, it joined the EAC’s eHealth collaborative as its base.

    It has developed an eHealth strategy, now in its second phase. The Rwanda Health Enterprise Architecture (RHEA) Framework is the core. It provides the foundation for its EHRs and using OpenMRS and OpenHIE.

    Rwanda uses Airstrip ONE, Sense4Baby, One Family Health for drugs distribution. It uses RapidSMS for maternal and child health servics.

    Rwanda's efforts as a driver of ICT has officially been recognized by the World Economic Forum (WEF). ITWEB Africa says Rwanda was ranked first in Africa in government success in ICT promotion to drive social and economic transformation in the 2015 Global Information Technology Report (GITR). The report, compiled by WEF, features the Networked Readiness Index. It assesses the factors, policies and institutions that enable countries to leverage ICT. Government success in ICT promotion is one of several sub-indexes of the GITR index. Rwanda's score was 6.2 out of 7.

    Rwanda’s 4G LTE project was recognised for its innovation in business model, innovative market structure and speed of rollout across the country in an award ceremony hosted by the Global Telecom Business Magazine in London. In November 2014. 

    The Northern Corridor partner states of Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and South Sudan have committed to signing a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to collaborate on preventing and responding to the increasing cyber-crime threat in the region. 

    The country has initiatives with IntraHealth, as posted on eHNA.

    The country has a supply chain managment system, described in an eHNA post.

    • 953 views
  • Sao Tome and Principe

    Sao Tome participates in a number of regional eHealth initiatives. 

    While São Tomé and Príncipe is without a national ICT plan, it does benefit from a direct link through the ACE undersea cable to the international broadband fibre-optic network. Bahnhof ST, one of the country's ISPs, has opened Internet schools both on São Tomé and Príncipe, where students can use fully-equipped computer labs.

    Sao Tome has a few eHealth service initiatives in eCare and eLearning. The country has a telecommunications law and a few health professional bodies.

    • 224 views
  • Senegal

    Senegal is a multi-ethnic country with a few eHealth service initiatives available. The country has a telecommunications law, a data protection law as well as a law on cyber crime. 

    At the hospital of Thiès, 92km away from Dakar, a remote medical consultation solution installed by Orange telecom to support consultations with specialists in Dakar. Orange has also developed an application which allows Senegalese health organisations to collect information on the national vaccination drives by Internet or by SMS.

    Senegal is a member of Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine (RAFT).and uses Smart Help app. IBM has a Watson initiative in the country. Orange plans to provide 4G by 2018.

    Learning about Living uses interactive eLearning techniques to provide tailored health messaging for the youth. It launched in Nigeria in 2007 and French version “Apprendre à Vivre” in Senegal in 2010.  An eHNA post has more.

    The country has initiatives with IntraHealth, as posted on eHNA.

    • 411 views
  • Seychelles

    Seychelles is a multi-ethnic country with a GDP per capita PPP of 25,000 dollars. The country has various eHealth service initiatives with a broadcasting and telecommunications act, data protection act and computer misuse act. Various health professional bodies exist in the country. There is a growing private healthcare sector.

    There is an Indian Ocean electronic disease suveillance system.

    The Seychelles is an African leader in ICT development, with high penetration rates and the most developed infrastructure in Southern Africa. The national ICT policy was introduced in 2007 and includes education, skills, industry, Government and access as key objectives.

    There is no medical faculty at the local university.

    There is good collaboration between ministries.

    • 380 views
  • Sierra Leone

    Sierra Leone is a multi-ethnic country with hardly any eHealth service initiatives. The country has a telecommunications act with no specific eHealth provisions or impact. Various health professional associations exist in the country.

    Its Ebola challengees in 2014 and 2015 have distrupted its modest eHealth initiatives.

    • 348 views
  • Somalia

    Somalia has very few eHealth service initiatives. The country has one of the lowest GDP per capita PPP in Africa.

    The total lack of government over two decades of war and strife has left generations of Somalians without access to basic services. Accurate data is lacking for much of the country. 

    • 203 views
  • South Africa

    South Africa published its eHealth Strategy in 2013. It has nine provinces with different levels of eHealth investment. It has an interoperability framework and a Strategic Health Innovation Partnerhip in place. 

    IT published its mHealth Strategy 2015 -2019 in July 2015. eHNA has a summary.

    It uses the District Health Information System (DHIS), MomConnect, Airstrip ONE, Sense4Baby, Smart Help app and TOMPSAs mTriage. There are a number of Hospital Information System vendors, including Meditech, Health System Technologies, Delta 9, InterSystems, T-Systems.

    IBM has a Watson initiative in the country.

    Some TB services use the SIMpill System (also know as On-Cue-Compliance) for text messages and intelligent pill dispensers to support treatment adherence and send information to a centralised server that monitors programme activity and alerts administrators when patients miss doses. eHNA has pieces on this here and here. A similar initiative for antiretroviral treatment support is called Wisepill.

    Mentor Mothers, a collaboration of Philani Maternal, Child Health and Nutrition Trust, University of California and South Africas Stellenbosch University, supports repeated home visits by trained community health workers to  mothers. An eHNA post has more.

    The country has initiatives with IntraHealth, as posted on eHNA.

    • 1,905 views
  • South Sudan

    South Sudan attained independence in 2011. The newly independent nation has significant challenges; almost half of the population earns less than a dollar a day and up to 83% reside in rural areas. There is a limited road network making logistics, especially transportation, challenging.

    Furthermore, the fragile health system has resulted in South Sudan recording some of the world’s worst health indicators including a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 2,054 per 100,000. Formidable challenges still exist in providing health services, developing health systems and supporting community engagement in South Sudan.

    Development partners have supported the implementation of the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS), through various implementation measures including the Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP), the Multi Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) and the Basic Services Fund (BSF). Additionally, the main humanitarian funding streams including the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), the European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO) and the Common Humanitarian Fund (CHF) have been funding NGOs to support the delivery of health care in South Sudan. 

    These implementation measures generally operated as humanitarian mechanisms and were largely effective in this mould. However, the services were, to an extent, provided in an ad hoc manner that resulted in fragmented, expensive services of variable quality. The mechanisms also faced many challenges, including not fostering Ministry of Health (MoH) ownership, reducing costs and increasing the quality of health services. 

    Due to these challenges, the MoH and donors have been working to improve the harmonisation between the major sources of funding, working towards the implementation of the Health Sector Development Plan (HSDP) 2012-2016 and newly updated Basic Package of Health and Nutrition Services (BPHNS 2011).

    Background to the Health Pooled Fund

    The HPF is a three and a half year fund, currently supported by the Governments of Australia, Canada, the British Government’s Department for International Development (DFID), the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) and the European Union (EU). The HPF supports services in six of South Sudan’s ten states: Eastern Equatoria, Northern Bahr el Ghazal, Western Bahr el Ghazal, Warrap, Unity and Lakes states. In October 2012, DFID awarded the contract to act as Fund Manager for the HPF to a consortium of organisations led by Crown Agents.

    Whilst supporting Health Service Delivery (HSD) and Health Systems Strengthening (HSS), the HPF will also help strengthen and enable the Government of the Republic of South Sudan (GRSS) to be the leader in developing a health delivery system that saves lives. This will be achieved through supporting transition to government-led service delivery by project conclusion in 2016.

    The key objectives of the HPF are to:

    To increase the utilisation and quality of health services, with an emphasis on maternal and child health. To scale up health promotion and protection interventions so as to empower communities to take charge of their own health. To strengthen institutional functioning including governance and health system effectiveness, efficiency and equity. To effectively manage the HPF mechanism.

    eHNA says South Sudan’s Health Pooled Fund (HPF) financed the first mHealth initiative. It’s a disease surveillance system where the SMS captures data on 15 diseases, including malaria, typhoid and measles.

    The Northern Corridor partner states of Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and South Sudan have committed to signing a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to collaborate on preventing and responding to the increasing cyber-crime threat in the region. An eHNA post has more.

    The country has initiatives with IntraHealth, as posted on eHNA.

    • 449 views