• Apps
  • Mobicure wins World Expo grant

    A Nigerian eHealth start-up Mobicure has won an Expo Live grant. An article in Disrupt Africa says it

    OMOMI application, which helps expectant mothers and parents of under-five-year-olds monitor the wellbeing of their children from home. The award’s up to US$100,000, made available incrementally depending on progress and results. 

    OMOMI’s a mobile platform. At the touch of a button, mothers can easily monitor their children’s health, access life-saving maternal and child health information and medical expertise. It was launched in Benin City in 2015 and now has 31,000 users with over 4,000 active monthly users. In the last nine months, it’s seen a 450% rise in users. The Expo Live grant will help it achieve three more goals. One’s an expanded reach to more families. Another’s adding more features and health information. The third’s promoting OMOMI to more parents in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Emirates is delighted to host the next World Expo, in Dubai in 2020. Will another African eHealth start-up succeed there?

  • Will the mHealth app market expand by 2020?

    Despite the hype around mHealth apps, the global mHealth app market is still niche. A report, mHealth App Market Sizing 2015 – 2020, by Research2Guidance believes it’ll change drastically over the next two years or so as mHealth app publishers refine their business models. Traditional apps store revenue sources like paid downloads, in-app purchase and in-app advertisement won’t be big enough to support the growing number of mHealth app publishers.

    The report focuses mainly on rich high-income clients, such as those in China, USA and France, all of which are in the top ten major country markets. Not surprisingly, no African country ranks in the top ten. This doesn’t mean that it’s not relevant for African countries.

    The report has five main parts:

    1.     Current market size, with  current mHealth market sizing in terms of app numbers, app downloads and app store revenues for all mHealth apps or by app category and identifying key app segments according to their current reach

    2.     Country mHealth markets, reviewing  the mHealth app markets of 56 countries. profiling ten countries which currently offer the best market potential for mHealth app publishers and information about the country mHealth app market characteristics, such as which platform leads in the country and required download numbers to enter a top five ranking position

    3.     Seventeen mHealth business models, describing of mHealth app publishers’ performance, their different monetisation strategies and the most commonly used business models for mHealth apps and  examples of best practice

    4.     Top mHealth app publishers, with their background and performance for the Health&Fitness and Medical app section and lists and descriptions of current, most successful Health&Fitness and Medical app publishers,  analysing their product portfolios and performance

    5.     mHealth market forecasts, with estimated market size and revenue until 2020, with  a detailed outlook on the demand and supply side of the mHealth app market, forecasting the number of mHealth app users, their platform preference and the number of downloads.

    Analysts, mHealth decision makers, mHealth app publishers and investors can all benefit from the insights in the report. It looks at important trends that African countries implementing mHealth solutions should be aware of. 

  • Discover Africa’s plethora of eHealth opportunities at eHealthAFRO 2017 Use-case Bazaar

    Industry stakeholders are realising the opportunity for eHealth to help expand access to healthcare resources, improve patient outcomes, and increase efficiency of healthcare services. The eHealth space in Africa is experiencing an explosion of new ideas and technologies, which the eHealthAFRO 2017 conference will showcase. It takes place at Emperors Palace from 2-4 October 2017.

    Afternoon use-case bazaars on Tuesday and Wednesday will allow conference participants to explore 48 new ideas and technologies. These sessions will feature compelling eHealth solutions and implementations. The use-case bazaar themes extend from the conference theme: eHealth for Universal Health Care (eH4UHC) and includes mobile apps and devices, eHealth systems and architecture, and eHealth use-cases demonstrating on-the-ground successes.

    Participating organizations include HISP-SA, UCT's CIDER, Jembi Health Systems, SANAC's Focus for Impact project, the AitaHealth assisted community outreach project, HPCSA’s new eLogbook for interns and many more.

    See the expanding list on the eHealthAFRO website. Don’t miss this opportunity to engage with industry leaders, share your ideas and keep abreast of eHealth developments in Southern Africa.

    If you or your organization have an interesting eHealth solution or project, let it be shown where Africa meets for eHealth. There are still a few open slots for organizations that would like the opportunity to showcase their eHealth idea or technology. For more on this opportunity, contact the eHealthAFRO organizing committee here.

  • EMGuidance scales its eHealth platform across Africa

    After its success at Seedstar SA, EMGuidance next step’s to scale its clinical facilitation platform across Africa. It’s ready to release of a slim-line version in eleven countries.  

    An article in Disrupt Africa says its centralised, interactive digital access point equips local doctors with the latest information. It reduces inaccurate decisions when they deliver care and administer medicines. A team of in-house doctors, pharmacists and national network specialists developed the app. It’s Africa´s first free, interactive and consistently updated mHealth medicines resource, with over 800 active ingredients listed. By August this year, there’ll be 1,200 listed. 

    The eleven countries are Botswana, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Namibia, Tanzania, Uganda, Cameroon, Rwanda, Sudan and Zambia.  Its platform’s available on Android and iOS. Over 5,000 doctors have registered since its launch. It’s gone viral, with over 80% of growth coming through word of mouth. 

    Over 20 medical institutions use EMGuidance to publish their clinical guidelines. It seems that EMGuidance’s set to roll out right across Africa.

  • Indian Ministry of Health pilots mHealth services

    Indian Health Ministry has stepped up its mHealth and eHealth services. The programme currently focuses on two districts. Baglung and Ilam. mHealth uses mobile apps and text messaging services to track pregnant mother´s ante-natal visits.

    An article in the Kathmandu Post says Medic Mobile, an organisation operating in 23 countries, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to scale up the programme in several districts. The MoU will strengthen health systems by promoting mHealth access, especially in isolated communities. Medic Mobile will also provide technical advice and support so eHealth and mHealth solutions are implemented and leveraged more effectively.

    So far, it’s been implemented by 83 Village Development Committees (VDC) in Gorkha and Dhading districts. Other districts will be able to build from the initial scale.  

    In Baglung, the Female Community Health Volunteers (FCHV) use mHealth to remind expecting mothers of their health facility schedules and visits. The service has been successful. The Family Health Division director, Dr Naresh Pratp KC, said the mHealth and SMS services “Have been effective to increase ante-natal visits.” 

    The service includes:

    Details of pregnant mothers are  entered onto an appReminders are forwarded periodically to FCHVsFCHVs are kept up to date of any complicated cases.

    Ante-natal care ensures a reduced risk of complications in pregnancy. However, irregular attendance by pregnant mothers on their mandatory four visits to health facilities’s an issue. Only 69% of women visited health facilities four times. It drops to 62% in rural areas. In urban areas, the figure’s 75%. 

    Bhogendra Dotel, the ministry spokesperson, said the mHealth services will soon be extended to track immunisation and disease surveillance. The initiative has important lessons for Africa’s health systems. Their maternity services share equivalent challenges and priorities.

  • Kenya launches app to protect health workers from HIV

    HIV’s still a big public health challenge for Africa’s health systems and their health workers. Many health workers see HIV+ patients every day, so exposed to cross-contamination risks, such as accidental pricks from contaminated needles and surgical blades and blood and other body fluid splashes that can result in contracting the HIV virus. Kenya's Ministry of Health (MoH) has partnered with Care for Carers (C4C), a carers’ platform, to provide an app to help healthcare workers have prompt medical care for accidental exposure to infections.

    It’ll provide a tool for health workers to ask for immediate attention says an article in Kenya Tech News. Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) drugs can reduce infection risk by over 80%, but have to be taken within three days of exposure. The dose’s needed for 28 days. They work by attacking and killing viruses before they cause HIV after they’ve multiplied. After the 28days, patients have to have two HIV done, each taking place after three months. Dr Martian Sirengo, head of the National Aids and STI Control Programme (Nascop), said “The time PEP is initiated, and the completion of the recommended dose is of great importance. And this new platform will help us with that.”

    Health workers have to log into the C4C platform and register. It then records information such as personal, employment, demographic data and any treatments. It then provides users with detailed procedural advice the MOH guidelines. The app also sends follow-up messages to encourage and advise practitioners to adhere to the requirements and provide information on PEP drug side effects.

    C4C enables county and national governments to monitor real time data on HIV exposure incidents in healthcare facilities. It also provides data on causes and risk exposure rates for locations. This can help to frame policies on safety in hospitals, creating safer working environments.

    M-health and Nascop helped developed the app. It’s currently used in Kisumu, Turkana, Meru, Embu and Murang'a counties.

    Kenya’ s not the only country struggling with these challenges. Other African countries need similar mHealth solutions to protect their healthcare workers. 

  • KardioPro helps to tackle cardiometabolic disease

    Cardiometabolic disease, a cluster of inter-related risk factors that can lead to atherosclerotic vascular disease and type 2 diabetes, is the world’s leading cause of morbidity and mortality. It kills more people than AIDS and malaria combined and places tremendous strain on healthcare resources and costs. Currently, the epidemic of cardiometabolic disease worldwide is being diagnosed, treated and managed in separate silos. Healthcare systems rely on repetitive, duplicated tests and services, which inevitably leads to reduced patient outcomes and increased costs. To address this challenge, the Kardiogroup, a connected health company, has developed the first comprehensive cardiovascular risk reduction and treatment approach.

    The Kardio Ecosystem links connected health devices as a Technology Enabled Care (TEC) to validated Point of Care (POC) blood tests. It provides accurate and validated risk analyses, links to emergency care and access to treatment protocols informed by local and international guidelines.

     

    KardioPro, an mHeath app, is part of the ecosystem. It integrates with diagnostic tools, including a cardiolabs to measure patients’ blood pressure and Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), a pulse oximeter, a professional wireless core body scale, and a glucometer.  Path Pro’s part of the configuration too. It provides the Alere Affinion Machine and the Abbott Istat POC pathology diagnostic equipment.

    Healthcare workers can use KardioPro to take measurements, connect to the KardioPro app from iPads or Androids, then visualise, track and share the results. It performs tests in 15 – 20 minutes, stores and organises results, simplifies patient monitoring and edits reports in PDF format so they can be shared by treatment teams. It also helps with the interaction of healthcare workers and patients to:

     

    •   Improve adherence

    •   Reassess treatments

    •   Reassure patients and explain to them the evolution of their health status

    •   Fix goals for patients

     

    The App:

    •   Is simple and easy to use

    •   Provides accurate risk analysis

    •   Has multi step reporting

    •   Provides treatment suggestions based on guidelines

    •   Delivers secure cloud based data capturing

     

    Tests performed by the app includes:

    HBA1C - Glycated Haemoglobin - This is used to test the 3 month average glucose of patients. It is used for screening for diabetes and used to monitor diabetic patients.   Lipogram - This is a full cholesterol panel which is one of the important components in cardiovascular disease. It measures the different types of cholesterol in the body which is important in assessing cardiovascular risk in patients Crp - known as C-Reactive Protein - This is an inflammatory marker test can be used to determine if antibiotic therapy is required in patients who are ill. Urine ACR - known as Albumin to Creatinine Ratio - These are the two key markers to test for chronic kidney disease.  U&E - Urea and Electrolytes - This is an important and common type of biochemistry test. It is used to assess Renal Function in Diabetic patients and are important screening test for patients with hypertension.  

    All health data generated by the device is secured and stored in an approved secure healthcare database. This is increasingly important with the rise in cyber-security threats.

    KardioPro is currently being used by 40 practitioners in South Africa. The solution has the potential to benefit resource poor communities across the continent. KardioPro is looking to expand internationally with interest to collaborate with international partners. 

  • Protecting our children from HPV

    One in every eight women in South Africa die from complications of  cervical cancer. Each year, 5,743 new cases of cervical cancer are reported. Almost half of these, 3,027 cases are fatal.

    About 80% of cervical cancers are caused by the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). It infects the genital area and causes anything from a small genital wart to cervical and other cancers. Vaccination can prevent the virus infection developing on the cervix. 

    In 2014, the South African National Departments of Health (NdoH) and Basic Education launched a national vaccination campaign to prevent cervical cancer by vaccinating girls aged over nine against HPV. The vaccination was aimed at 500 000 girls from 17 000 public and special schools to provide them with protection before they can be exposed to HPV infection. 

    In co-ordination with the government’s Integrated School Health Programme (IHSP), school health nurses visit schools twice a year to vaccinate the girls. None of them are vaccinated without parental consent.

    As the vaccination campaign grew, collecting data became more complex and challenging. NDoH approached the Health Information Systems Program South Africa (HISP-SA) to lead implementation of a mobile data capturing application. It supports data capture during the campaigns. 

    The app’s part of the NDoH's routine health information system, DHIS2, sometimes referred to as webDHIS. It was customised for the campaign by HISP-SA’s Lusanda Ntoni and piloted in three provinces. Then, it was developed further using findings from field visits, and implemented during the 2016 campaign. 

    A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) document helps vaccinators and data capturers to transfer HPV data from registers into the tracker capture app. There’s also a guideline for programme managers and information officers on accessing dashboards with information from the campaign on  webDHIS. These were updated as the app was implemented. 

    To date, the app’s been implemented in all nine provinces in South Africa, a task co-ordinated by HISP SA’s HPV project manager, Margaret Modise. It’s simplified HPV dashboards for monitoring and reporting and shows how a simple mHealth initiative can enhance the productivity of vaccination campaigns. Will this way of capturing data lead to more large-scale campaigns in South Africa?   

  • Hospitals need better cyber-security from their app developers

    The pace of innovation in healthcare is staggering. mHealth apps are helping to push it along. Innovators are speeding apps through development processes to bring them to market as quickly as possible. It often means cyber-security’s not a priority, leaving healthcare organisations to pick up the consequences.

    “There are a million different apps out there – the problem is the low barrier to entry into the healthcare market,” said Kurt Hagerman, CISO at cyber-security firm Armor Defense, in an article in Healthcare IT News.“When you look at the EHR vendors, they cannot be everything, they have to focus on a core set of services and then allow others to supplement those large, monolithic EHR systems with other apps.”

    With some EHRs having a narrow focus, there’s a rush to capitalise on using mHealth to provide personal health data and advice. These factors combined are a challenge for health systems to use the latest innovations without compromising protected health information and personally-identifiable information. 

    The first step’s educating developers about the healthcare industry and its unique requirements. Health systems working with app developers need to be explicit from the outset about their cyber-security requirements. Hagerman says “To protect confidentiality, integrity and availability, you have to build strong authentication credentials, you have to encrypt.”

    Beyond education, it’s up to health systems to be better at enforcing cyber-security, ask app developers the right questions and demand the protections that defend patient health data. “A sense of urgency is building – you cannot just build an app, there are security requirements. The industry is starting to correct this a little bit,” he added.

    Healthcare providers need to construct a stronger message for developers. Better cyber-security’s crucial to protect patients’ personal data. They can’t afford to carry the risks of insecure and vulnerable mHealth.   

  • Magee and CMU’s app can combat pre-term birth

    Pre-term births are before babies have completed their 37 weeks of gestation. WHO has estimated that 15 million babies are pre-term each year, and it’s rising. Complications associated with pre-term births are the leading cause of the high mortality rates of children under five. Three-quarters of these deaths could be prevented with current, cost-effective interventions.

    An article in Medicalxpress says that maternal-fetal specialists at Magee-Women’s Hospital has collaborated with scientists at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to develop and test a personalised smartphone app to combat pre-term birth. It engages pregnant women living in remote locations.

    Research in the Journal of Medical Internet Research mHealth and uHealth, found that the app was successful in providing accessible and personalised obstetric care designed specifically to target risks of pre-term births. Tamar Krishnamurti explained that

    "Mobile phone apps are a great way to engage a vulnerable population in their health care because approximately 86 percent of American adults own a mobile phone, regardless of racial and ethnic groups."

    Users voluntarily logged into the app every one and a half days to complete daily risk assessments. Algorithms then provided specific, personalised risk feedback, with bespoke recommendations. If the app detects a decrease in self-reported cigarette use, it provides encouraging messages and resources about quitting resources. It  also provides basic pregnancy education, reminders about appointments and fetal health monitoring aids like a kick counter. When the app detects high-risk events, such as intimate partner violence or thoughts of suicide, it sends real-time alerts to medical staff. Women are then contacted directly and linked to appropriate medical and social service resources. While there are several apps to support pregnancies, few are developed through a  patient-centred scientific process and grounded in behavioural decision research. The next step in this technology is to conduct randomised controlled trials over entire pregnancy cycles to evaluate  the app’s benefits for behavioural and clinical outcomes, including adverse birth outcomes. It seems to offer Africa’s health systems and pregnant women effective opportunities to reduce substantially the number of pre-term births.