• AeHIN
  • AeHIN says good eHealth governance methodology can transform health systems

    Information from eHealth investment’s reaches into many health and healthcare activities. Successful utilisation and benefits realisation needs effective governance.

    Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN), with support from the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and CC and C Solutions, an ICT training firm, has crafted a set of governance and architecture methodologies.  It aims to help health systems start the work needed to guide their eHealth projects at national scale.

    In a blog on Standards and Interoperability Lab Asia (SIL-Asia), Alvin Marcello says nine countries agreed to create the Health Information Governance and Architecture Framework (HIGAF). It’s based on a simplified Control Objectives for Information and Related Technologies 5 (COBIT 5) framework. 

    HIGAF helps developing countries address their health sector needs. It complements the Convergence Workshop for Ministry of Health national eHealth strategies. Many developing countries are accelerating their eHealth investment, but have yet to work out their governance approaches. 

    The governance initiative is part of a long-standing series of AeHIN initiatives that include: 

     WHO-ITU National eHealth Strategy Toolkit, introduced in 2012Training six countries in national eHealth strategy development in 2013Myanmar’s first Convergence Workshop to convene international NGOs, development partners, and the private sector in 2015 Guidance for Investing in Digital Health, 2018 Digital Health Impact Framework User Manual, 2018.

    AeHIN’s sustained focus and support is a collaborative model for Africa’s health systems. A challenge is the raising the finance to achieve.

  • SIL-Asia reports on the Digital Health Impact Framework (DHIF)

    Economic and financial evaluations of eHealth investment options rely on modelling. The Digital Health Impact Framework (DHIF) User Manual and Illustrative Models, help health systems to set up and develop them. The DHIF is a ten-step methodology developed by Tom Jones, Peter Drury, Philip Zuniga and Susann Roth, for the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

    A blog from the Standards and Interoperability Lab Asia (SIL-Asia) emphasises the value of using examples to help users. These appear in the manual and online models. The combination of techniques and examples are from six illustrative models:

    SMS for maternal and child healthmHealth for telemedicine for a current patient catchment areamHealth for telemedicine with an expanded catchment areasMalaria surveillance and interventionCapital and leasing finance for an EHRStrategic mix and choices.

    The six models are not templates. DHIF is a generic methodology, with every DHIF model being bespoke. 

    The approach is practical and rigorous and provides a valuable foundation for our efforts at Acfee to develop an eHealth Impact Model for Africa (eHIMA). Acfee colleagues like Tom Jones, who has been involved in many related international initiatives, provide a critical overarching perspective that will help to ensure that the various frameworks emerging are both appropriate to their regions of development, while following a sound, common conceptual methodology.

    Creating options is a DHIF core skill. The first four are single options for the initial stages of digital health projects. In practice, several options for each project are analysed in these early stages. The EHR example has two options and in practice would have more.

    The blog shows two dimensions for options. They’re vertical and horizontal:

     

     

    The vertical dimension is mainly incremental and thus, relatively easy to compile. Meanwhile, the horizontal dimension is more challenging. They have significant differences to options on the vertical dimension, and not incremental.

    An illustrative model on strategic mix and choices shows positive socio-economic returns but have considerable risk exposure and affordability challenges. The comparison can support agreements on decision criteria for eHealth investment. Examples are:

    Maximum patient impactLowest riskHighest socioeconomic benefitLowest cost.

    At the ADB workshop on 31 January 2018 in Bangkok, participants identified decision criteria they would use to select which of the six illustrative DHIF models they would retain in an affordable digital health strategy and why. Their ideas are set out in the DHIF User Manual.

    Modellers new to DHIF should start small. Rome Business School has a short online DHIF course. It’s in English, and coaches modellers using their own digital health projects.

  • Acfee’s director supporting SIL-Asia

    eHealth proponents know the importance of standards and interoperability. In Asia, it has an effective regional umbrella. The Standards and Interoperability Lab – Asia (SIL-Asia)’s powered by the Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN). It has significant, sustained support from the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and co-sponsorship by the People's Republic of China Poverty Reduction and Regional Cooperation Fund (PRCF).

    This substantial support has enabled SIL-Asia to provide a wide range of services to its members. Its Tooling page includes:

    Investing in Digital Health: Digital Health Impact Framework (DHIF)Guidance on Investing in Digital HealthDigital Health Terminology GuideTransforming Health Systems with Good Digital Health Governance: Health Governance Architecture FrameworkHealth Enterprise Architecture FrameworkSIL-Asia Cloud Set-upSIL-Asia FHIR Service.

    Countries can use SIL-Asia’s tools for their digital health implementation programmes. There’s more to come, including :

    A technology benchmarking frameworkInteroperability toolkitImplementation guide.

    SIL-Asia’s assets for countries’ use include:

    RxBox, a telemedicine device OpenMRSCHITS, an OpenMRS EMRBahmni,a HIS based on OpenMRSZato.io, a python based Enterprise Service BusWSO2, a Java-based, open source enterprise service busMedicCR, a Master Patient Index (MPI) developed by Mohawk LabOpenHIM, a JS-based mediator developed by Jembi Lab. OpenEMPI, a Java-based MPIOpenInfoMan, a health worker and facility registryDHIS2.

    Having completed his initial work on the DHIF, Acfee’s Tom Jones has taken on the role as a SIL-Asia partner. As Acfee’s Director of Strategy and Impact, it will provide a valuable bridge between Asian and African eHealth initiatives and challenges. Acfee envisages that Africa’s health systems will benefit considerably.

  • Asian Development Bank presents eHealth guidance at AeHIN conference

    Weak eHealth strategies lead to weak digital health investment. Maximising success and minimizing failure’s a core ADB eHealth theme. It sees effective eHealth strategies as requirement, and it presented its Guidance for Investing in Digital Health to the Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN) 6th annual conference this week in Colombo, Sri Lanka

    The guidance describes the healthcare context that’s needed for eHealth strategies. Peter Drury, the project lead, then set out essential issues that included identifying and engaging with stakeholders and pursuing digital health strategies that are drawn from health and healthcare strategies and that achieve a balance between value for money and affordability.

    He sees strategies as only part of the process, and similar to his word association of fish and chips and bacon and egg. For eHealth, it’s strategies and investment. Sharing experiences of the two are important.  There are examples of effective strategies that he’s seen across Asia available from AeHIN’s Standards and Interoperability Lab (SILA). These provide valuable insights for Africa’s health systems and for African countries contemplating new national eHealth strategies. 

  • Mongolia’s completing a big scale eHealth project

    Remote, large and sparsely populated; Mongolia offers a lesson on pursing a wide range of eHealth investment. Tucked in between Russia and China, it’s a country of about 3.1m people spread across 1.5m km. About half the population live in Ulaanbaatar, the capital.

    Dr Sereenen Enkhbold, Mongolia's eHealth Project Coordinator presented his country’s Role of E-Health Project in improving health information interoperability in Mongolia at Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN) 6th annual conference in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The objective’s to improve integration and utilisation of health information and eHealth solutions for better health service delivery. It’s about half way through four-year the project that started in 2016.

    The project, financed extensively by the World Bank incorporates:

    Health sector enterprise architectureHealth data and information technology standards DICOM, LOINC and HL7Health data dictionariesHIE platformHealth statistics and dashboardeHealth appsInvestments in primary healthcare facilities.

    The next phase includes benefits realisation and change management. Taken together, the project is a benchmark for Africa’s health systems.

  • Sri Lanka’s eHealth story stretches over 20 years

    The reputation of Sri Lanka’s continuing eHealth story is considerable. At the Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN) conference in Colombo, Prof Vajira Dissanayake of the Health Informatics Society of Sri Lanka (HISSL) described the from1998 to 2108 and beyond.

    It’s set out in Digital Health in Sri Lanka. This describes the sustainable implementation of digital health solutions through local capacity building. The lessons for Africa’s health systems are essential reading. It extends over 17 topics, including:

    Strategic planningPersonal health numbers and master patient indexElectronic indoor Morbidity and Mortality Register (eIMMR)Hospital Health Information Management System (HHIMS)HIMSElectronic Patient Information Management System of the National Programme for Tuberculosis and Respiratory DisordersElectronic Reproductive Health Information Management System (eRHIMS)Electronic Non Communicable Diseases System (eNCD)Registering and Verification of the Electronic Health Information SystemsSuwasariya telehealth programmeStroke Clinical RegistryEssential Drug Stock Alert Tracker Sri Lank Journal of Biomedical Informatics (SLBMI)HISSLS’s short history.

    Beyond 2018, other initiatives are coming through. Partners include UNICEF and Bloomberg Philanthropies. UNICEF provided finance for the app District Nutrition Monitoring System. Children’s nutrition won the prize for the best early stage app in South Asia.

    The sequence reveals a continuing strategic eHealth trajectory. Equivalents for Africa will be valuable in learning from the past and setting strategic trajectories, road maps and investment plans.

  • Asian Development Bank presents its Digital Health Impact Framework at AeHIN conference

    eHealth investment decisions usually end up by balancing value for money with affordability. It’s a regular end point for business cases for eHealth and a core ADB eHealth theme for its Digital Health Impact Framework (DHIF). It presented this and other components to the Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN) 6th annual conference this week in Colombo, Sri Lanka

    DHIF is a methodology for estimating and analysing socio-economic costs and benefits over time to identifying value for money and how long it takes to achieve it. Then it converts these into financial and accounting estimates to assess affordability. Tom Jones, the project lead, set out these issues that included:

    Deriving eHealth benefit requirements for health and healthcare strategiesIdentifying and engaging with stakeholdersManaging assumptions and estimateseHealth leadership, change management and new business models.

    The methodology has ten steps, but modellers and decision takers using DHIF for the time should choose only those components that are critical to the immediate decisions. From these, they can build up expertise and move towards using the full set.

    Risk is a constant in eHealth investment. DHIF can be used to estimate risk exposure that leads on to risk mitigation plans.

    Optimism is also common. DHIF provides adjustments for optimism bias, which can increase cost estimates with a range of lower than 40% up to 200%.

    Other material from the presentation is available from AeHIN’s Standards andInteroperability Lab (SILA). They can help Africa’s health systems improve their Health decisions, especially where parallel investment is needs in healthcare resources and new business models.